Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Beretta Nano Review Part 1B - Range Problems

This was going to be my Beretta Nano Review Part 2 from the range, but unfortunately this is going to just be a little teaser review and I'll follow up with the full range review as soon as I can.  I discovered some issues with my Nano that are detailed below, so as soon as it's back from service I'll run through Recoil-Cam, shooting from many holds and positions, and maybe even a terminal ballistics test or two.

I'll start out with the positives.  I went to my go-to holster companies and secured a Remora Hyde 4A SS holster for appendix carry.  I've been a fan of Remora holsters for quite some time and the introduction of the Hermann Oak leather lining has really improved the product in my opinion.  The holster has more body and feels more comfortable.  It's not as stiff as the kydex reinforced top models so you still need to remove the holster from your waistband for reholstering, but the trade off is that it feels thinner than the original synthetic lined Remora holsters.  I've only worn the holster for a few hours, but you can see in the picture below that the leather holster liner is starting to form to the gun very nicely.  My plan is to use the 8 round magazine and the Remora Hyde IWB holster for appendix carry.


RKBA Holsters has made several holsters for me over the years.  Stephen is really good to work with if you decide you want something a little different than what's listed on the RKBA website.  I asked Stephen to make me a right hand Coyote Brown Kydex pocket holster and include a thumb push-off.  I'm very pleased with the way the holster turned out.  The FDE grip isn't a perfect match with the Coyote Brown Kydex, but I think it still looks pretty good.  At one time, Stephen was making clear Kydex holsters.  In retrospect, that might have looked even cooler than the brown.  My plan is to carry the Nano with the 6 round magazine as a pocket gun in this holster..


On the range, I could tell something wasn't quite right with the pistol.  I really didn't like the feel of the extra long and heavy trigger pull.  This wasn't the trigger pull I was expecting based on feedback from other Nano owners.  I put enough rounds through it to experience a couple failures to extract and called it a day.  Normally I'd run through at least 200 rounds on a review day, but with ammo supply being what it is and the early problems popping up I thought it better to save the ammo for another day.

When I got home, I decided to check the trigger pull weight with my Lyman Digital trigger pull gauge and discovered the weight was running 8.5 to 10 lbs.  Not good at all.  Looking closely, I noticed the slide would creep back a fraction of an inch just before the striker released.  That wasn't a good discovery either.  Beretta customer service told me what to look for and how to diagnose my problem.  The video below documents the range session and also the root cause of the trigger pull problem.


After the Nano Review Part 1 went up on the blog, I had folks ask me if I would demonstrate the process of removing the Nano Chassis from the Grip Frame.  I really wasn't planning on demonstrating that, but I had to remove the chassis from the frame to visually confirm the root cause of my trigger problem.  In the picture below, the red arrow is pointing to the the trigger bar spring.  Normally, this spring lays flat against the grip frame.  Not sure how mine got bent, but it did and is making my trigger pull overly heavy and far too long.


If you were one of the folks asking me to demonstrate the chassis removal procedure, your video is below.  It's really pretty simple and much easier to do than it reads like in the manual.  Parts that drop off the chassis are easily replaced so you don't need to worry about executing the procedure perfectly the first time around.  Learn from my mistake and follow the instructions in the manual about removing and securing the the slide catch spring.  I didn't do that step to save time and ended up spending 20 to 30 minutes crawling around on the floor looking for the spring.  Ultimately, I found it and got the pistol back together.  


I called back into Beretta Customer Service yesterday to explain my problems and also to confirm that my trigger bar spring was bent as they expected it would be.  I also mentioned the FTEs I had on my first trip out.  They want the pistol back for diagnosis and repair so I'll get it sent out this week and I'll pick up with the review when it gets back to me.

Overall this is a bummer but as I said in my video, they can't all be perfect.  So far Beretta Customer Service has been very good about working with me on my problems.  Hopefully, the Nano will be back quickly and I will be able to wrap up the review and make the video on installing the night sights.  Stay tuned....there will be more Nano posts coming in the future.

7 comments:

  1. The Nano is on my short list for a pocket 9mm. I've got a pistol I already carry IWB, but I've wanted something I could put in a pocket for awhile. I'm pretty much down to the CM9 and the Nano, with the Nano being in the lead, partially due to the availability of the extended 8-round magazine. I'm looking forward to hearing your update on this. Hopefully Beretta will do a good job getting this resolved.

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    1. I like the Nano but let me first say i am a SIG FAN. The Nano is good but the trigger is it's only down fall. If the trigger was only better i would keep it. The trigger is very long, very rough and at the end you must press extra hard. Nine or ten pound trigger pulls are average.
      It drives me crazy that when you buy a gun you must pay extra money just to get a decent trigger ! Now for it's good points. It is snag free, small but not to small to handle. At the range fair accuracy even with the trigger, construction is good .
      The Sig P290 rs will be it's replacement, sorry Beretta. The Sig is a true double action, very smooth, more accurate.

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  2. The Nano and 8 round magazine isn't going to be a pocket carry option. The grip will be far too long for most pockets. With the 6 round magazine, it should work great in the front pocket.

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  3. Agreed, but I like the option of having the 8-round available if I happen to carry a second mag with me. Obviously if I have to pull the 2nd mag, pocket carry is no longer the concern. After doing a bit more research this weekend, I think it's going to be the Nano. I'm still curious to see if they get your issue resolved. Just curious, since it wasn't clear to me, was the spring bent because you had removed the insert from the frame? Or did the spring come that way from the factory? I notice in your removal video that you have to pull a spring over a pin (I believe it was a pin)as part of the process - is that the same spring that had the problem? If so, I wonder if there is an easier way to do this that doesn't end up damaging that spring.

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    1. Actually, there are two different springs. The bent spring that was causing trigger problems arrived that way from the factory. Because I had to visually verify that spring was bent, I decided to make the video showing how to remove the chassis from the grip frame.

      The spring that must be removed from the frame pin is a normal step in removing the chassis and that spring was not damaged in the process. If you go to the Beretta website, they have their Nano manual available for viewing.

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  4. So the slide should not move back slightly as you begin pulling the trigger?

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    1. According to Beretta, that's normal.

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